NPR Music News

The Two-Way
1:33 pm
Sat October 25, 2014

Jack Bruce, Bassist And Singer For Cream, Dies At 71

Jack Bruce, left, seen here with fellow Cream members Ginger Baker (center) and Eric Clapton in 1967, has died. The bassist sang such hits as "Sunshine of Your Love."
George Stroud Getty Images

Scottish musician Jack Bruce, who co-founded the rock band Cream and created seminal music in the 1960s, has died, his family has confirmed. Bruce played bass in the trio that included Eric Clapton on guitar and Ginger Baker on drums. He sang such hits as "Sunshine of Your Love," "White Room" and "I Feel Free."

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Movie Reviews
6:03 am
Fri October 24, 2014

James Brown On Film: An Admiring And Unflinching Look At 'Mr. Dynamite'

James Brown performs onstage at the TAMI Show on December 29, 1964 at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in California.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 11:36 am

Eight years after his death, James Brown is suddenly everywhere.

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Music News
3:22 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Who Sang It First? Mockingbirds And Musicians Cover Each Other In New Orleans

A short phrase New Orleans musicians use to communicate is identical to a common mockingbird call.
Sven Halling Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:47 pm

In certain New Orleans music scenes, there is a special sound — a signal — that lets players know it's time to pick up their instruments and strike up the band.

"It's a bugle call, or a band call, to assemble," trumpeter Leroy Jones says.

"It's like: C'mon, rally," musician Matt Bell adds. "Come to the bandstand and be ready to do it. Let's go."

The four-note phrase, however, doesn't belong to musicians alone. Another common New Orleans species, the mockingbird, also produces the call.

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Music News
4:13 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Taylor Swift Sells White Noise In Canada

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 6:32 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. You might say the musician Taylor Swift is so popular fans will listen to whatever she puts out. Like this single from an upcoming album...

(WHITE NOISE)

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The Record
3:33 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Are These The Next Crossover Country Stars?

Sam Hunt has written hits for both Kenny Chesney and Keith Urban. His debut album, Montevallo, is out on Oct. 27.
Chase Lauer Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 7:41 am

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All Songs Considered
8:00 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Sleater-Kinney Reunites, Announces New Album

Janet Weiss (left), Carrie Brownstein (center) and Corin Tucker of Sleater-Kinney. The trio's first album since 2005 will be out on Jan. 20.
Brigitte Sire Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 10:19 am

Sleater-Kinney is back together, has a new album coming out Jan. 20 via Sub Pop records, and will go on tour early next year. The album is called No Cities to Love, and you can listen to the first single, "Bury Our Friends," right here.

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The Record
5:05 am
Sun October 19, 2014

The Right Way To Complain About The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

Future Hall Of Famers?: Green Day's Tre Cool (left), Billie Joe Armstrong (center) and Mike Dirnt) in New York City in 1994.
Ken Schles Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 19, 2014 1:39 pm

As a music geek, I often find myself in conversations, either online or over cocktails, about the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Indeed, I've been nerding out about the Hall since last Thursday, when the institution announced its shortlist for induction into the Hall Class of 2015. And when I find myself in polite but argumentative company debating the Rock Hall, I have an approach I use.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:21 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Postlude To A Kiss: Scriabin's Raging 'Poem Of Ecstasy'

Alexander Scriabin originally set out to write a piece called "Orgiastic Poem," centered on physical ecstasy, but later decided to alter the title to something more ambiguous.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 2:46 pm

I love composer anniversaries because they afford us opportunities to look at musicians anew, and 2015 will mark the centenary of the death of Russian composer Alexander Scriabin. It's quite possible that you've never heard of Scriabin, but take comfort in the fact that even his biographer said, "No one was more famous during their lifetime, and few were more quickly ignored after death."

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Deceptive Cadence
3:05 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Twenty Years Later, 'Klinghoffer' Still Draws Protests

Several hundred protesters picket the opening night of the Metropolitan Opera season at Lincoln Center, Sept. 22, 2014. "You will be made to destroy that set," Jeffrey Wiesenfeld said.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 5:26 pm

The Metropolitan Opera in New York is bracing for one of the more controversial productions in its history. Since its first performance more than 20 years ago, some critics have charged that composer John Adams' The Death of Klinghoffer is anti-Israel, and even anti-Semitic. But the opera's supporters dispute that. They argue that Klinghoffer is a dramatic masterpiece that deserves to make its Met debut on Monday.

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Music News
2:28 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Capricorn In Retrograde: Macon's Endangered Musical History

Otis Redding in 1967. Redding was also known as "The Mad Man From Macon."
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 5:35 pm

City officials in Macon, Ga., say they may have no choice but to demolish the crumbling original headquarters of Capricorn Records, the label that played a key role in the birth of Southern rock and soul music.

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