On this edition of Ozarks, a conversation with the director of a new documentary investigating an old Fort Smith murder case. Plus, this week’s installment of the NWA Business Journal Report.

Rusti Barger, a stay-at-home mom of six, delivered her first two babies in the local hospital. When she became pregnant a third time in 1999, she and her husband David, from rural Faulkner County, chose to have a home birth. They hired a midwife who instructed her to undergo a state-mandated medical risk assessment. Barger made an appointment at the county public health clinic. And that’s where, she says, things went awry. 

COURTESY / WHO KILLED MISSY WITT?

Melissa Witt disappeared from a Fort Smith bowling alley on Dec. 1, 1994. Her body was found near Ozark on Jan. 13, 1995, but to this day, 22 years later, no one has been arrested in the case. Since 2015, LaDonna Humphrey has been using a Facebook page called "Who Killed Missy Witt?" and an anonymous tip line to develop new leads. Her work and that of her team will be compiled into a documentary, which they hope to release later this year.

NWA Economy Doing Well

8 hours ago

At this week's Quarterly Business Analysis Luncheon in Fayetteville, an economist said the Northwest Arkansas region continues to shine in per capita income, but household debt is a concern. We hear more in this week's Northwest Arkansas Business Journal Report.

Republicans React to Trump Budget

9 hours ago

Members of the Arkansas congressional delegation – all Republicans – say they’re still evaluating the proposed budget President Trump has sent to Congress.

Lt. Governor Tim Griffin is a former Congressman and U.S. attorney who worked on a special counsel case involving Clinton Housing Secretary Henry Cisneros. He recently joined Roby Brock from our content partner Talk Business and Politics for a unique perspective on what’s going on in Washington D.C.

This spring the King Fahd Center for Middle East Studies and the University of Arkansas School of Law hosted a symposium titled "Violence in the Name of Honor."

On this edition of Ozarks, how the Arkansas Immunization Action Coalition is using grants to boost immunization rates. Also, a UAFS professor researches memes.

Randy Veach, president of the Arkansas Farm Bureau, tells Talk Business and Politics' Roby Brock that several Arkansas crops have been devastated by recent floods.

MUSIC: "Trusty and True" by Damien Rice

The Arkansas Immunization Action Coalition, a group made up of nurses, doctors and other public health stakeholders, is offering 25 mini-grants to help improve the state's health through immunizations.

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World and Area News

Updated at 1:07 a.m. ET

Republican Greg Gianforte won the special election for Montana's lone congressional seat on Thursday despite an election eve misdemeanor assault charge for allegedly body-slamming a reporter.

An Arkansas man is charged with trespassing and public intoxication after state police say he climbed the gate at the governor's mansion.

Court records show 55-year-old Edward Harper of North Little Rock was charged with the misdemeanor counts after being arrested about 1:10 a.m. Thursday on the grounds of the mansion.

Jail records show Harper remains in custody and court records do not list an attorney for him.

WATCH: Impromptu Song Shows Manchester's Resilience

6 hours ago

A Manchester crowd's impromptu rendition of "Don't Look Back in Anger," by hometown band Oasis, emerged as an uplifting emblem of resilience after Monday's deadly bombing there.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

When Ahmed Badr was 8 years old, his family's home in Baghdad was bombed in the midst of the Iraq War. The family was uninjured. They moved to Syria, which was peaceful then, and in 2008, they came to the U.S. as refugees.

Writing helps Badr deal with what he's been through, and he wants to give other young people the same outlet. Now a student at Wesleyan University, Badr founded the website Narratio to empower others to tell their stories.

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