On today’s show, as the younger workforce numbers continue to grow in northwest Arkansas, young professionals are reaching out to each other. Plus, an Arkansas-based study on fracking. And from Austin, Texas...the band Knife in the Water plays in the Firmin-Garner Performance Studio.

J. Froelich / KUAF

A pair of Hendrix College research biologists have assessed the ecological cost of damage to natural habitat from oil and gas fracking on major plays across the U.S., as well as in Arkansas. The research is published in the June issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

People between the ages of 20 and 34 make up the largest percentage of residents in Washington County, northwest Arkansas as a whole, and the entire state. Government numbers show 27 percent of Arkansas residents are millennials, or people born between 1981 and 2000. That’s a slightly larger percentage of Natural State residents than baby boomers, who make up roughly 24 percent of the population. Those numbers are for 2015 and most, if not all, estimates predict the number of millennial residents has only increased and will continue to increase in northwest Arkansas.

It's hot outside, so Becca Martin Brown of the Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette gives us some weekend options of things to do away from the scorching heat.

courtesy photo

Knife in the Water is a band that formed 20 years ago in Austin, Texas. In their early days, they released three records and one EP and even toured with Calexico. The band slowly ran out of steam, until a new record began to take shape in 2015. That record, titled “Reproductions” was released earlier this year. Most of the band’s members have changed, but guitarist and vocalist Aaron Blount and pedal steel player Bill McCullough are still fixtures of the five-piece band. While the band was touring the region in support of the album, they made their way to Fayetteville.

On today’s show...how Facebook is making global medicine better. An Arkansas-based pathologist has created a world-wide effort to bring better medical information to people. Plus Arkansas’ second-leading industry rolls along; we hear a conversation with Kane Webb, the director of the state’s parks and tourism department. And, how an old movie spurred Slaid Cleaves to write a new song.

Looking Ahead in Fort Smith

Jul 20, 2017

Michael Tilley, from Talk Business and Politics, joins us a day early this week to discuss how traffic, education and art are playing a role in Fort Smith's future.

courtesy / University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

A Facebook group of thousands of doctors is helping spread medical information and advice around the world. We talked with Dr. Jerad Gardner at UAMS about the effort.

Thursday roundup: an Arkansan on a national commission examining voting, money for Eureka Springs and Governor Asa Hutchinson asks for bipartisan work on health care.

Tourism Rolls on in Arkansas

Jul 20, 2017

This week's Northwest Arkansas Business Journal includes a conversation with Kane Webb, the director of Arkansas Parks and Tourism, about the state's second-leading industry.

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World and Area News

Detroit has faced a tumultuous past, but the most painful week in Detroit's modern history arguably happened exactly 50 years ago. On July 23, 1967, after decades of discrimination, poverty, and mistreatment by police, many black citizens of Detroit erupted in violence. Some call that five-day period of burning and looting the "riots;" others call it the "uprising" or the "rebellion."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Two days after his 69th birthday, Snooty the manatee has died in what the South Florida Museum says was "simply a heartbreaking accident." The manatee drowned after being trapped by a hatch door, officials said Sunday.

Snooty was the oldest manatee in captivity — and he was believed to be the oldest on record, according to the South Florida Museum, which houses the Parker Manatee Aquarium in Bradenton, Fla.

"Aquarium staff is heartbroken," said Jeff Rodgers, the museum's provost and chief operating officer.

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