On today's show, local sheriffs hear from the community about their decision to participate in the 287(g) program that allows deputies to get involved in immigration enforcement. Plus, the staff at the Buffalo National River puts together a song parody to encourage visitors to come see the solar eclipse at the park and Farmington students start the year at a new high school.

A. GRAJEDA / KUAF

Local and national officials affiliated with the 287(g) program hosted an annual meeting Aug. 15 to explain the initiative to the public as well as listen to questions and comments from community members.  

DANIEL BREEN / KUAR

Supporters of a program that allows undocumented children to stay in the U.S. are urging Arkansas’s Attorney General to change her position on the issue.

A large group of supporters and recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program crowded into the Little Rock office of Attorney General Leslie Rutledge on Tuesday. They met with Carl Vogelpohl, Rutledge’s Chief of Staff, and presented him with a petition organized by the Arkansas United Community Coalition.

A Wednesday roundup: a new online tech jobs approach, reaction to the privatization of the Arkansas Department of Youth Services and more than a million dollars for Arkansas clinics.  

COURTESY / GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN CHURCH

Pastor Clint Schnekloth from Good Shepherd Lutheran Church discusses his summer meetings with elected Arkansas officials in Washington.  

COURTESY / NASA

The staff at the Buffalo National River got creative with a music video to encourage people to visit the park for this month's solar eclipse. They have also planned special events leading up to the viewing of this highly anticipated celestial event. Park Guide Lauren Ray outlines all the activities in our interview.

A. GRAJEDA / KUAF

A new school year often means new clothes, a new haircut and new classes. This year it also means a new school for Farmington High School students. Sophomores, juniors and seniors will be studying in a recently constructed facility that has larger classrooms and updated amenities.

On today's show, we remember legendary Razorback Head Coach and Athletic Director Frank Broyles, who died at the age of 92 this week. We also get a tour of Fort Smith's Osteopathic College, which welcomed its inaugural class of students just a few weeks ago, and if you haven't heard, there's going to be an eclipse next week, we take a look at how schools are preparing for the celestial event.

COURTESY / ARKANSAS RAZORBACKS

Frank Broyles, longtime football coach and athletic director, died Monday at age 92. We remember some of his accomplishments.  

COURTESY / ARKANSAS COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE

The first students at the Arkansas College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Smith are in the third week of the semester. We take a tour of the new college.  

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