Ozarks At Large

Weekdays at noon and 7 p.m. and Sundays at 9 a.m. on 91.3 FM

This locally produced news magazine has covered news, sports, politics, arts & culture and the quirky and unusual happenings in the Ozarks for more than two decades.

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Soy has been widely accepted as a heart-healthy food for nearly two decades.  Manufacturers of packaged food products have claimed that soy protein reduces the risk of coronary heart disease, and labeled their products thusly.

Now, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration isn’t so sure and is seeking an unprecedented revocation of the authorized claim.  With an authorized claim, manufacturers get a stamp of approval from the FDA to directly state a health benefit — calcium, for instant, helps stymie osteoporosis.

The agency said a review of evidence linking soy protein to improved heart health wasn’t conclusive enough to warrant an authorized claim. 

Douglas Balentine, director of the Office of Nutrition and Food Labeling, said studies have evolved since the authorized claim for soy's heart benefits was approved in 1999.

Ozarks at Large for Monday, November 20, 2017

Nov 20, 2017

On today’s show, with Sears closing stores in Fayetteville and Fort Smith, what does this mean for the malls left with empty retail space? Plus, a classic love story connects an embattled nation with northwest Arkansas. And what became of the hopes and dreams for the Arkansas delta catfish to be as important as poultry in northwest Arkansas? We find out.

courtesy: University of Arkansas

In October, Sears announced it would be closing its stores at the Northwest Arkansas Mall and Central Mall in Fort Smith. Mervin Jebaraj, the interim director of the Center for Business and Economic Research at the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas discusses why Sears was a game changer in the past and what has happened since, as well as how department stores and malls are trying to stay relevant in today's retail landscape.

Brad Graham is driving his truck along the edge of a catfish pond near Lake Village, blowing a soybean grain mixture into the water.

“My stepdad was into fish farming, and I just decided I wanted to do a little bit of farming,” he says.

He began farming with four ponds right after college during a time when politicians and entrepreneurs hoped catfish in the Mississippi Delta could become what chicken is in the Ozarks. That was before Vietnamese and Chinese fish flooded the American market about 10 years ago.

Adapting Shakespeare To Tell Syrian Story

Nov 20, 2017

Ozarks at Large takes you inside the artistic process as Fayetteville-based theater director Kholoud Sawaf brings her hometown of Damascus Syria to life for US audiences. Sawaf is adapting Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet in a project at TheaterSquared that aims to let audiences in northwest Arkansas, and beyond, learn more about her native country and city. Today we begin a series of behind-the-scenes stories leading up to the production.y.

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