Karen Tricot Steward

As Content Development Director, Karen Tricot Steward helps with the creation of news and cultural programming and helps set standards and best practices. She manages digital content on our website and social media platforms. She also works with local program producers and people who pitch programming ideas to public radio. In addition, Karen coordinates the internship program, helping fulfill public radio’s goal of serving the community by being a place of learning.

She started at KUAR in 2001 as a news reporter. She has also served as local host and news anchor for Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

For her news reporting, she has won several awards from the Arkansas Associated Press for stories on topics like the Little Rock mayoral race and Iraq war veterans in Arkansas. She also won a first place award from the Society of Professional Journalists for investigative reporting. Karen has worked at Stone Ward, an advertising agency in Little Rock, as well as for the University of Utah and the University of Iowa. Karen has a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Phone: 501-569-8491

E-mail: karen@kuar.org

An online company that delivers groceries is making its way into the central Arkansas market tomorrow, hoping to appeal to customers by changing the way they view shopping. 

The San Francisco-based company Instacart, already in 33 states and the nation’s capital, is expanding into markets across the country at a rapid pace.

The following is a statement from the Broyles family regarding the death of former University of Arkansas football coach, athletic director, ABC commentator, and Alzheimer’s advocate Frank Broyles. Coach Broyles, 92, died from complications of Alzheimer’s Disease, on August 14, 2017. 

“It is with profound sadness that we announce the passing of Coach Frank Broyles. He passed peacefully in his home surrounded by his loved ones.

One in four first responders in Arkansas have PTSD, moderate to severe anxiety disorder, or are at high risk for suicide, according to a statewide study currently underway surveying the state's firefighters and paramedics. 

The politics of public health will be at play as Arkansas moves forward with studying pregnancy-related deaths.

Arkansas has the third-highest rate of women who die during pregnancy or delivery, according to the United Health Foundation. This has prompted a study into the matter.

A group of Arkansas lawmakers are headed to Boston for an annual legislative summit.

The event, held by the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), brings together more than 6,000 lawmakers, legislative staff, and federal officials from around the nation to discuss policy issues. Those issues will range from laws on autonomous vehicles to election technology.

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