Karen Tricot Steward

As Content Development Director, Karen Tricot Steward helps with the creation of news and cultural programming and helps set standards and best practices. She manages digital content on our website and social media platforms. She also works with local program producers and people who pitch programming ideas to public radio. In addition, Karen coordinates the internship program, helping fulfill public radio’s goal of serving the community by being a place of learning.

She started at KUAR in 2001 as a news reporter. She has also served as local host and news anchor for Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

For her news reporting, she has won several awards from the Arkansas Associated Press for stories on topics like the Little Rock mayoral race and Iraq war veterans in Arkansas. She also won a first place award from the Society of Professional Journalists for investigative reporting. Karen has worked at Stone Ward, an advertising agency in Little Rock, as well as for the University of Utah and the University of Iowa. Karen has a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Phone: 501-569-8491

E-mail: karen@kuar.org

Unless there has been a rush of people this week who successfully logged on to a state website before a 9 p.m. deadline Thursday, thousands of Arkansas Works enrollees will be out of compliance with a newly enacted work requirement.


In selecting a candidate for the state Supreme Court, Arkansans vote in non-partisan judicial elections. This means party affiliation is not indicated on the ballot, and candidates are prohibited by a code of conduct from talking about the issues.

But, that hasn’t always been the case. 

In 2009, Vicki and Darrell Gatwood of St. Anne, Illinois, made quite a discovery. They were renovating an abandoned house that was in desperate shape. The grass was overgrown, the floors were sunken and a tree had fallen and torn a hole in the roof.

As they looked around, they came across stacks of papers: musical manuscripts, letters, photos, diary fragments and other writings. They kept seeing a name over and over: Florence Price.

The conversation about how opioids can, and should, be prescribed continues in Arkansas. We have a special report from Karen Tricot Steward of our partner station KUAR in Little Rock.

Bill Witty sits on his front porch on a large plot of land in Harrison, Ark. He lost his daughter Jill to an opioid overdose. She was 24 years old.

In the distance, over some rolling hills, is the cemetery where Jill is buried.

"You'd have to have field glasses to see it, but you can see her headstone from here," Witty points out. 

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