Jacqueline Froelich

KUAF Reporter, "Ozarks at Large" and NPR Correspondent

Jacqueline Froelich is an investigative journalist and has been a news producer for KUAF National Public Radio since 1998. She covers politics, the environment, energy, business, education, history, race and culture. Her radio segments have been nationally syndicated. She is also a station-based national correspondent for NPR in Washington DC., and recipient of eight national and state broadcast awards. 

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Sequoyah Fuels Corporation has a defunct factory site in Gore, Oklahoma on which the company would like to bury tons of stockpiled nuclear waste. On today's program, we learn how the Cherokee Nation and the State of Oklahoma have prevented that from happening, at least for the time being. Also, our Tech Ambassador returns to give us tips to stay secure on the Internet.

courtesy / Cherokee Nation

The Cherokee Nation and state of Oklahoma have temporarily restrained Sequoyah Fuels Corporation from burying tons of stockpiled nuclear processing waste on the company's defunct factory site in Gore, Oklahoma. The plaintiffs say doing so will imperil two major watersheds shared by the states of Arkansas and Oklahoma.

On today’s show, is nuclear power’s comeback complete? Arkansas Nuclear One has a 20-year extension. Plus the US Marshals Museum plans to open in Fort Smith in 916 days. Also, the evolution of the past couple of centuries of American legal ethics.

Arkansas Nuclear One, a few miles northwest of Russellville, is among 61 commercial nuclear power facilities in the U.S. operating ninety-nine nuclear fission reactors. Constructed in the late 1970s and currently owned by Entergy, Arkansas Nuclear One operates two pressurized light water reactors with the capacity to generate 1,776 megawatts of electricity, enough to power 355,000 homes and businesses.

The reactors are cooled by water drawn from Lake Dardanelle. Thick white steam rising from the power plant's iconic six-story hyperbolic cement tower is visible for miles. Locals, Russellville Mayor Randy Horton says, divine weather conditions from the plume. 

“In the old days, we would drive to the base of the cooling towers and fish in the hot water discharge stream. It never was threatening, never been scary.”

On today's program, we learn how the Center for Art and Education is laying plans to move to a new space in downtown Van Buren. Also, we learn how the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design is working with the School of Forest Resources at UA Monticello to source sustainable construction materials to promote forest growth.

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