Jacqueline Froelich

KUAF Reporter, "Ozarks at Large" and NPR Correspondent

Jacqueline Froelich is an investigative journalist and has been a news producer for KUAF National Public Radio since 1998. She covers politics, the environment, energy, business, education, history, race and culture. Her radio segments have been nationally syndicated. She is also a station-based national correspondent for NPR in Washington DC., and recipient of eight national and state broadcast awards. 

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Ahead this hour, we get prepared for tick season and tick-borne illnesses. May is Lyme and Tick-borne disease awareness month in Arkansas. Also, we hear how some schools in the state are seeking an exemption to the state’s new campus carry law. And Dylan Earl stops by to play us some country music as we head into the weekend.

Ticks are tiny blood-sucking arachnids that feed on deer, birds, rabbits, squirrels, rodents and lizards. During bloodmeals, Arkansas ticks may absorb pathogens naturally carried by wildlife, with strange names like Tularema, Rickettsia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Borrelia. So when ticks feed on people, they regurgitate bacteria into the bloodstream.

On this edition of Ozarks, a conversation with the director of a new documentary investigating an old Fort Smith murder case. Plus, this week’s installment of the NWA Business Journal Report.

Rusti Barger, a stay-at-home mom of six, delivered her first two babies in the local hospital. When she became pregnant a third time in 1999, she and her husband David, from rural Faulkner County, chose to have a home birth. They hired a midwife who instructed her to undergo a state-mandated medical risk assessment. Barger made an appointment at the county public health clinic. And that’s where, she says, things went awry. 

On today's Ozarks, the Arkansas Supreme Court requests a raise in pay for its justices. And the rise of downtown revivals in Northwest Arkansas.

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