Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for SI.com. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Mikaela Shiffrin narrowly missed a podium finish in the slalom at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, falling short in her bid to become the first U.S. skier to win three gold medals and failing to win a medal in the event she won at the 2014 Games.

Shiffrin wasn't able to claw back enough time from a first run that left her in fourth place and nearly half a second behind the leaders — and that's where she remained after the top skiers raced their second and final run of the day. In the end, she was a combined 0.40 seconds off the No. 1 time and just 0.08 seconds from being third.

Mikaela Shiffrin overcame both delays and some of the best skiers in the world to claim her first gold medal at the 2018 Winter Olympics, winning the giant slalom. The weather finally cooperated, with sunny, clear skies over the Yongpyong Alpine Center in Pyeongchang.

Norway's Ragnhild Mowinckel won silver, 0.39 behind Shiffrin's combined time of 2:20.02.

Let's acknowledge at the outset that despite its name, Iceland can be brilliantly, beautifully green. But the country lies far north of the equator, and a small part of it has an ice cap. One Icelander even made waves this week for posting a photo of herself hanging out laundry in chest-deep snow.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

Shaun White pulled off a gold-medal comeback in the halfpipe, and Japan's Ayumu Hirano won silver on the strength of a phenomenal second run.

CORRECTION: An early version of this story reported that White had won silver — that was reported after the second run had completed. On his third run, White won gold.

Erin Hamlin was shut out from the podium in the women's singles luge at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics on Tuesday, as Germany went 1-2 and Canada took the bronze.

Hamlin, who in 2014 became the first American to win an Olympic medal in singles luge (winning bronze) finished with a combined time that was 0.680 behind the winner, Natalie Geisenberger, over four runs down the track at Alpensia's Olympic Sliding Center in South Korea.

It's the second consecutive gold for Geisenberger, who also won in Sochi. Her cumulative time was 3:05.232.

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