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The Two-Way
3:50 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

#NPRreads: A Sign Of The Times? Trinidad Offers Venezuela Toilet Paper For Oil

People line-up outside of the Bicentenario, a state-run supermarket, in Caracas, Venezuela, on Jan. 9. Most of the shortages in Venezuela are driven in part by the country's tight currency controls, which make it hard to get dollars at a subsidized rate for imports while creating a thriving black market for currency.
Fernando Llano AP

#NPRreads is a new feature we're testing out on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom will share pieces that have kept them reading. They'll share tidbits on Twitter using the #NPRreads hashtag, and on occasion we'll share a longer take here on the blog.

This week, we share with you three longish reads.

From Didrik Schanche, NPR's deputy international editor:

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Movie Reviews
3:44 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Tense 'Eastern Boys': Cruising, and Bruising

Eastern Boys begins as a home invasion story but evolves to something more complex, says NPR film critic Bob Mondello.
Courtesy of First Run Features

Seen from street level, the young Eastern European men cruising a Paris train station at the outset of Eastern Boys would doubtless look like individuals. But filmmaker Robin Campillo has positioned the camera overhead, and from his bird's eye perch it's clear they're working in tandem — looking out for each other, stealing, soliciting.

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Book Reviews
3:44 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Book Review: 'Satin Island' By Tom McCarthy

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Humans
3:44 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

A Neuroscientist Weighs In: Why Do We Disagree On The Color Of The Dress?

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Remembrances
3:44 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

NBA's First Black Player Paved Way For Others In League

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's All Politics
2:32 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

What Do Conservatives Want For 2016? We Asked

Josh DiNatale (left) and Zachary Burns, St. Joseph's University students and members of their College Republicans chapter, get ready to pose for a photo with a cutout of Sen. Rand Paul at CPAC 2015.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 2:53 pm

The Conservative Political Action Conference, held this week in Washington D.C., is prime time for 2016 Republican presidential hopefuls trying — yes, already — to win over a key part of their base. Former Gov. Jeb Bush, Sen. Ted Cruz, Ben Carson, Gov. Scott Walker and others paraded on and off the main stage, trying to fire up the crowd with their ideas for America's next, post-Obama chapter.

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NPR Story
2:24 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

After Red Carpet Controversy, A Look At The History Of Dreadlocks

Actress Zendaya attends the 87th Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood & Highland Center on February 22, 2015 in Hollywood, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

On Sunday’s glamorous Academy Awards red carpet, Disney star Zendaya Coleman decided to shake things up and wear dreadlocks extensions with her Oscar gown.

The following day when the E! network’s Fashion Police aired, the show’s co-host Giuliana Rancic commented that the 18-year-old woman looked like she smelled of “patchouli oil” or “weed.”

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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

'Star Trek' Star Leonard Nimoy Dies At 83

Actor Leonard Nimoy arrives at the premiere of Paramount Pictures' 'Star Trek Into Darkness' at the Dolby Theatre on May 14, 2013 in Hollywood, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 2:36 pm

Leonard Nimoy, known around the world as Spock on “Star Trek,” died this morning at age 83. Nimoy, of course, was more than just Spock. He was a poet, a photographer and a musician. But he touched a chord as the brainy, unflappably logical, half-human half-Vulcan Spock.

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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Young Singers Beat The Odds To Sing With National Honor Choir

Fifth graders (from left) Claire Thompson, Sophia Porreca and Tamilyn Lechuga all attend Kunsmiller Creative Arts Academy. (Courtesy Denver Public Schools)

Tonight and tomorrow, 1,200 students from across the country will perform with the National Children’s Honor Choir in Salt Lake City.

It’s one of the most prestigious junior choruses in the country. Among them will be three students from a school in southwest Denver, where more than three-quarters of the kids qualify for free or reduced lunch.

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

5 Quotes From Earl Lloyd, The First Black Player In The NBA

Earl Lloyd, who became the first black player to play in the NBA in 1950, died Thursday at 86. He's seen here, center, being inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame's Honors Ring in 2003.
Jim Bourg Reuters /Landov

Earl Lloyd, who became the first black player in the NBA nearly 65 years ago, died Thursday at age 86.

Lloyd had a long career that stretched from West Virginia State to basketball's Hall of Fame. He once told a young man who thanked him for being a pioneer, "Man, you owe me absolutely nothing."

As a player, the 6'5" Lloyd was nicknamed The Big Cat. He was drafted in the same year as other black players, but he was the first to play in the regular season, for the then-Washington Capitols.

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