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The Two-Way
6:25 am
Wed August 5, 2015

Two Trains Derail In India, Killing At Least 24; Floodwaters Blamed

Two passenger trains lay next to each other in India after they derailed Tuesday night. The accident is being blamed on flash floods on a bridge outside the town of Harda in Madhya Pradesh state.
AFP/Getty Images

In a span of minutes, two passenger trains traveling in opposite directions derailed in central India Tuesday night, sending them into the mud along a riverbank. At least 24 people died; officials say that tracks near the river had been flooded by monsoon rains.

Images from the scene show the trains' cars and engines resting at odd angles near the bridge, with the tracks lying twisted and curved in the mud. More than 300 people survived the crashes, according to multiple reports.

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Television
5:17 am
Wed August 5, 2015

Love Is Dead: Ms. Piggy And Kermit Call It Quits

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Strange News
5:17 am
Wed August 5, 2015

Villainous Scheme Makes Dozens A Few Minutes Late

Originally published on Wed August 5, 2015 7:07 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
5:08 am
Wed August 5, 2015

Untangling The Many Deductibles Of Health Insurance

Originally published on Wed August 5, 2015 7:08 am

Sure, there's a deductible with your health insurance. But then what's the hospital deductible? Your insurer may have multiple deductibles, and it pays to know which apply when. These questions and answers tackle deductibles, whether an ex-spouse has to pay for an adult child's insurance, and balance billing.

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Around the Nation
4:17 am
Wed August 5, 2015

DNA Testing Identifies Another Victim Of Brutal Florida Reform School

Originally published on Wed August 5, 2015 6:40 am

Copyright 2015 WUSF-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wusf.usf.edu/.

Asia
4:17 am
Wed August 5, 2015

In Peaceful Sri Lanka, Army Holds Thousands Of Acres Seized In Civil War

Originally published on Wed August 5, 2015 5:17 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
4:17 am
Wed August 5, 2015

Making Mountains Out Of Trail Markers? Cairns Spark Debate In Southwest

A cairn marks a trail in Arches National Park in Utah. Some build the piles as a meditative exercise, but their proliferation has infuriated some other nature lovers.
Larry Clouse CSM/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 5, 2015 7:14 am

When people go hiking these days, all kinds of gadgets can help guide their way. But historically, humans used something a lot more low-tech: a pile of rocks.

The piles, technically called cairns, have marked trails for millennia, but in recent years, these stones have become steeped in controversy.

To Beth Dinet, stacking stones provides "an overwhelming sense of peace, and connecting with onenness."

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Parallels
4:17 am
Wed August 5, 2015

An 'Island Tax' Could Harm One Bright Spot In Greek Economy

Petros Hatzigeorgiou, whose family has been making wine for more than 150 years, at his winery outside the village of Atsiki, Lemnos. He says islanders can weather the tax by working harder. "That's how we can fight it, no matter how much it hurts," he says. "By showing them we can survive despite it."
Joanna Kakissis NPR

Originally published on Wed August 5, 2015 6:44 am

For years, hotels, shops and restaurants on the far-flung Greek islands kept costs low thanks to a big tax break. And tourism has been one bright spot in Greece's barely functioning economy.

The Greek islands are still enjoying record numbers of tourists this summer.
But now the country's creditors are demanding those islands raise their taxes to the same level as everywhere else in Greece.

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NPR Ed
4:17 am
Wed August 5, 2015

The New, New Framework For AP U.S. History

Protesters join hands in Charleston, S.C. after nine black parishioners were gunned down during a church Bible study on Sunday, June 17.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Wed August 5, 2015 6:03 am

The College Board has just released the latest curriculum framework for its Advanced Placement U.S. history course, and it appears to have satisfied many of the old framework's critics.

The re-write comes after anger over its 2014 framework sent the College Board, which administers the AP exam, back to the drawing board.

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Sweetness And Light
4:17 am
Wed August 5, 2015

Bryce Harper Or Mike Trout: Are These Two Too Good?

Los Angeles Angels Mike Trout (left) and Washington Nationals Bryce Harper during warmups before the start of their baseball game in April 2014 in Washington.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed August 5, 2015 6:40 am

Because college football and basketball are so prominent, when the best players move up to the pros they're already well known.

However, baseball's different.

How many of you pretty good sports fans can tell me who won the baseball College World Series just a few weeks ago? Same with the players. Even the stars drafted highest are anonymous except to the real cognocenti. And even then, whereas invariably the can't-miss prospects in other sports don't miss, hardly ever miss, in baseball nobody ever says: can't miss. Fact is, the ones who miss too often are the scouts.

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