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"I'm not comfortable eating a watch battery." That's how researcher Christopher Bettinger describes one of the biggest obstacles for sending tiny medical robots into the human body for diagnosing and treating diseases.

These devices run on batteries (like those in watches) and they are usually made of toxic materials such as lithium.

The first commercial flight from the U.S. to Cuba in more than half a century has taken off today, marking another milestone in the thawing relationship between the two countries.

The inaugural trip is a JetBlue flight from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., to Santa Clara in central Cuba. And as NPR's Scott Horsley tells our Newscast unit, the plane is piloted by two Cuban-Americans.

"JetBlue Captain Mark Luaces and First Officer Francisco Barreras are both the sons of Cuban immigrants," he says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It sounds like a crazy idea. Convince a survivor of sexual assault to tell her story by filming herself with a fire-breathing dragon imposed on her face.

That's what Indian journalist Yusuf Omar did. He discovered that Snapchat, a mobile app that allows users to create photo or video "stories" that disappear after 24 hours, can be used to document a victim's first-person account while obscuring his or her identities.

Its built-in "filters" — illustrated or animated digital overlays — can transform a subject's face into anything from a flower child to a puppy.

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