COURTESY / WHO KILLED MISSY WITT?

Melissa Witt disappeared from a Fort Smith bowling alley on Dec. 1, 1994. Her body was found near Ozark on Jan. 13, 1995, but to this day, 22 years later, no one has been arrested in the case. Since 2015, LaDonna Humphrey has been using a Facebook page called "Who Killed Missy Witt?" and an anonymous tip line to develop new leads. Her work and that of her team will be compiled into a documentary, which they hope to release later this year.

NWA Economy Doing Well

May 25, 2017

At this week's Quarterly Business Analysis Luncheon in Fayetteville, an economist said the Northwest Arkansas region continues to shine in per capita income, but household debt is a concern. We hear more in this week's Northwest Arkansas Business Journal Report.

Republicans React to Trump Budget

May 25, 2017

Members of the Arkansas congressional delegation – all Republicans – say they’re still evaluating the proposed budget President Trump has sent to Congress.

Lt. Governor Tim Griffin is a former Congressman and U.S. attorney who worked on a special counsel case involving Clinton Housing Secretary Henry Cisneros. He recently joined Roby Brock from our content partner Talk Business and Politics for a unique perspective on what’s going on in Washington D.C.

This spring the King Fahd Center for Middle East Studies and the University of Arkansas School of Law hosted a symposium titled "Violence in the Name of Honor."

On this edition of Ozarks, how the Arkansas Immunization Action Coalition is using grants to boost immunization rates. Also, a UAFS professor researches memes.

Randy Veach, president of the Arkansas Farm Bureau, tells Talk Business and Politics' Roby Brock that several Arkansas crops have been devastated by recent floods.

MUSIC: "Trusty and True" by Damien Rice

The Arkansas Immunization Action Coalition, a group made up of nurses, doctors and other public health stakeholders, is offering 25 mini-grants to help improve the state's health through immunizations.

University of Arkansas Fort Smith Associate Professor of English Bret Strauch uses internet memes in his classes and studies their cultural meaning and implications.

MUSIC: “Graveyard Memes” Field Tombs

ADEQ Director Testifies in House

May 24, 2017

The head of the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality is praising President Trump’s EPA for taking a step back from directing states. ADEQ Director Becky Keogh testified to members of the U.S. House Science, Space, and Technology’s subcommittee on Environment yesterday. Keogh complained that Arkansas regulators were routinely second-guessed by President Obama’s EPA and immersed in expensive legal research.

Pages

World and Area News

In Mexico, the race is on to save a small, gray porpoise that is on the brink of extinction. It's called the vaquita, which is Spanish for "small cow."

Scientists believe only 30 remain in the warm, shallow waters of the Gulf of California, between Baja California's peninsula and mainland Mexico — the only place they live in the world.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has declared 23 Arkansas counties disaster areas after recent flooding.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson says in a news release Friday he was informed of the designation from Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue. Counties designated as disasters include Faulkner, Lonoke and Randolph.

Perdue visited the state in early May and said in his letter to the governor that there were sufficient production losses in those counties to warrant a designation.

Another 23 counties were designated contiguous disaster areas.

The U.S. Senate plans to spend the summer writing health care legislation to repeal, replace, or tweak the Affordable Care Act. The House has passed a bill that congressional analysts say would reduce the deficit and cut 23 million people from their insurance. Arkansas Public Media’s Sarah Whites-Koditschek spoke with Senator John Boozman about his goals for health care.

What are your priorities for health care legislation?

Rural Arkansas has so much to offer in terms of picturesque surroundings and low cost of living that it should be marketed as the newest retirement hot spot, according to participants of the 2017 Rural Development Conference in Hot Springs this week.

Community leaders gathered at the Convention Center to discuss the quality of life issues for rural residents, such as internet access, better-paying jobs and healthcare.

Despite the perception that health care appointments are hard to come by in rural Arkansas, county judge John Thomison said Lawrence County fares pretty well for medical care.

More News