Of Note with Katy Henriksen

Sunday through Thursday evenings from 8 to 10 p.m.

Catch two hours of compelling classical music with your host Katy Henriksen Sunday through Thursday evenings from 8 to 10 p.m. only here on KUAF. Henriksen brings classical music into the 21st century by handpicking the most vital recordings of today alongside groundbreaking historic releases while bringing insight into the world of classical music today through feature interviews with composers, musicians, conductors and all the people who make this riveting world possible.

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After two weeks of music, arts and entertainment, the Artosphere Festival ends its 2018 run this week. The 9th annual festival aims to connect arts with environmental issues in unconvential ways. 

Ephemera from the life of celebrated Little Rock-born composer Florence Price is now online thanks to a digitization project by the University of Arkansas Libraries Special Collections Department

The harp is not the first instrument that comes to mind in an indie rock setting- so the ethereal instrumentals of L.A.-based harpist Mary Lattimore are often an unexpected accompaniment in the venues she plays. 

"I really love to bring the instrument into a modern situation where it doesn't seem so precious and so alien," Lattimore says.

Lattimore performs at Stage Eighteen in downtown Fayetteville this Saturday, June 2. 

As part of their ongoing project to record all of the Beethoven String Quartets, the Miro Quartet tackles String Quartet No.14, Op 131- a piece from one of the most tumultuous periods in the great composer's life.

Emerging from familial struggles at the twilight of his life, the piece is one of "yearning for something else, as well as perhaps dreams for happiness or memories of times past."

Jazz and classical sensibilites collide on pianist Robert Prester's new album, Rapsodya

The album tackles classical solo works from master composers as well as his first ever take on composing in the sonata form. Prester says that an accidental move to the New York City neighborhood of Queens led to a creative flood that helped shape his new work. 

"Queens just felt like this big, wide-open craziness," he says. "It was a great period for me." 

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