Zuzanna Sitek

Reporter, Ozarks at Large
Z. Sitek / KUAF

The Bentonville Parks and Recreation Advisory Board on Monday unanimously supported removing the dam at Lake Bella Vista and restoring Little Sugar Creek. The move had been championed by local nonprofit Friends of Little Sugar Creek after the city announced it planned to use money from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to rebuild the failed dam following destructive flooding in 2015.

courtesy: Sebastian County government

Sebastian County leaders have applied for a $750,000 federal grant to start a mental health court similar to the county's drug and veterans’ courts. County Judge David Hudson says a mental health court would provide long-term treatment beyond care provided at the Crisis Stabilization Unit that opened in March. Both the CSU and the mental health court would allow low-level offenders to stay out of jail or prison and would instead address the mental health issues that contributed to their arrests.

Z. Sitek / KUAF

Eureka Christian Health Outreach, or ECHO, uses volunteers and donors to run a free healthcare clinic for low-income people who have no health insurance. Now, ECHO founders Dan and Suzie Bell, along with Eureka Springs resident Kimberly Clark and Mayor Butch Berry, have turned to that model to build an affordable housing community along Passion Play Road and Highway 62.

Z. Sitek / KUAF

The Eureka Springs Parks and Recreation Commission unveiled on Thursday a new, downhill-specific mountain biking trail system at Lake Leatherwood. The trails are driven by gravity, which means riders do not have to pedal because they are going downhill while encountering obstacles like jumps or drops. The downhill park was funded by a $1 million investment from the Walton Family Foundation.

Z. Sitek / KUAF

The City of Fayetteville and the University of Arkansas are partnering to bring a bike share system to Fayetteville. Officials from both entities are reviewing vendors who have submitted proposals for a bike share service, which is expected to be up and running by fall. The system will be dock-less, which means users in Fayetteville will use a smartphone app to access bikes wherever they are.

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