Sumner Coy

The Fort Smith Symphony embarks on a series of diverse concerts this season, each exploring frontiers of musical expression- as well as the very literal frontier of Fort Smith, which turns 200 next year.

Conductor John Jeter stopped by to discuss the concerts of 2017-2018 and the multitude of styles it explores.

Arianna Dominguez

American pianist Simone Dinnerstein chose the unlikely setting of Cuba to tackle two Mozart piano concertos. "In Havana, wherever you walk there is music," she explains of the vibrant city. The resulting Mozart in Havana, a collaboration with the vibrantly youthful Havana Lyceum Orchestra conducted José Antonio Méndez Padrón, exemplifies the way music transcends boundaries.

Axiom Brass, a Chicago-based quintet, is on a mission to redefine chamber music for their instrument family and, as a result, the entire genre.

"People don't usually realize the more intimate side of brass playing," explains Kevin Harrison, tuba player for the quintet. "That's the approach we take. We play music and we share and talk about our experiences with that the pieces we play with our audiences to create that intimate connection."

At the young age of 22, Polish-Canadian pianist Jan Lisiecki already claims seven years as a recording artist on Deutsche Grammophon. His latest, Chopin: Works for Piano & Orchestra, marks his second release exploring a composer near and dear to him.

"It has the capability to pierce through any armor and go directly to your heart," Lisiecki says of Chopin's music. Find out more in his interview for Of Note with Katy Henriksen.

Fresh off the heels of their live scoring of sci-fi classic Metropolis ​for Trillium Salon Series, the Shadow Ensemble returns with a presentation of F.W. Murnau's Nosferatu. The group, dedicated to live scoring silent films, moves away from musically interpreting glittering towers and subterranean art deco factories to tackle the rustic foreboding mists of Transylvania. 

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