Katy Henriksen

KUAF host of "Of Note", Arts Director and contributor of "Ozarks at Large"

Katy Henriksen is a Fayetteville native who grew up in a musical household. She began violin lessons at age six and later added voice, viola and piano to her musical studies. She was briefly a music major at the University of Arkansas before switching over to print journalism (B.A. '00, M.A. '03) and she's been covering arts and culture ever since, both here in Northwest Arkansas and in New York City, where she lived from 2004 to 2008. 

She's covered arts and culture for the Brooklyn Rail, New Pages, Oxford American, Paste, the Poetry Project Newsletter, Publishers Weekly, Venus Zine, Wondering Sound and others. You may have seen her documentary Rare Edition, about the Dickson Street Bookshop, on AETN. Her favorite violin concerto is Mendelssohn's Concerto in E minor. In addition to joining KUAF as the classical music and arts producer, she's the music editor for The Rumpus, an online cultural magazine based in San Francisco.

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Of Note with Katy Henriksen
12:32 pm
Sat November 22, 2014

Sunday Symphony for November 23: A Lovely Apocalypse

Stemming from the idea that life may again return to living solely in the ocean, John Luther Adam's new Pulitzer Prize winning composition Become Ocean highlights our past and poses a grim future. Tune in Sunday to hear the Seattle Symphony perform what music critic Alex Ross describes as, "... the loveliest apocalypse in musical history."

Listen to it on KUAF's Sunday Symphony.

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Of Note with Katy Henriksen
9:33 am
Sat November 22, 2014

Of Note for Monday, November 24: A Precurser to Greatness

Almost all have heard the magnificent finale to Beethoven's final symphony, most commonly referred to as Ode to Joy. However, many are unaware of what music scholar Jurgen Otten describes as, "the little sister of the composer's last completed symphony." Tune in to hear Beethoven's precursor to his most beloved work, performed by the Mahler Chamber Orchestra and the Prague Philharmonic Choir.

Listen to it on Monday's Of Note with Katy Henriksen.

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Of Note with Katy Henriksen
9:44 am
Thu November 20, 2014

Of Note for Thursday, November 20: Charged Turbulence

Joaquin Turina's music was not only influenced by the tumultuous time in which he lived, but also by the range of cultures he found himself a part of. Growing up in Seville, he was exposed to the culture center's rich history, but he also spent a great deal of time in Paris, Madrid, and much of southern Europe. Facing a world at war, Turina certainly understood the devastation of conflict, as the cultures he fused together through his music were so divided. 

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Of Note with Katy Henriksen
12:55 pm
Mon November 17, 2014

Of Note for Monday, November 17: A Challenge for Listeners and Performers Alike

Retrospective, a three concert series highlighting the words of Soviet era composer Alfred Schnittke, premiers November 18th in UA's Giffels Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Join me as I sit down with visiting players to find out why this concert poses a challenge for listeners and performers alike.

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Of Note with Katy Henriksen
11:37 am
Mon November 17, 2014

Of Note for Friday, November 14: Concerts to Feature Rare Works by Soviet Era Composer

Retrospective, a three concert series featuring the music of Alfred Schnittke kicks off Tuesday, November 18 with a concert at UA's Giffels Auditorium. Featuring works ranging from chamber to film to solo this is a rare opportunity to hear the composer in a live setting. Listen to it on Friday's Of Note With Katy Henriksen​.

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Of Note with Katy Henriksen
11:05 am
Thu November 13, 2014

Of Note for Thursday, November 13: Benefit Concert to Aid Libraries Here and Abroad

The fourth annual Books for Tomorrow Benefit Concert will feature local violinist Miho Oda-Sakon accompanied by UA music professor Tomoko Kashiwagi. This concert will benefit the rebuilding of libraries in the Vilonia and Mayflower regions, along with the Children's Library in Rikuzentakata, Iwate, Japan. Join me as I sit down with Sakon and Kashiwagi to learn of their efforts and enjoy a brief preview of their upcoming performance.

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Of Note with Katy Henriksen
5:10 pm
Mon November 10, 2014

Of Note for Tuesday, November 11: Concert Series to Highlight Alfred Schnittke

Next week begins a three concert series sponsored by the University of Arkansas Department of Music focused on the life and compositions of Alfred Schnittke. Entitled Retrospective, the concerts will feature film, chamber, and small ensemble works by the composer, performed by faculty, students, and local musicians. In honor of these performances, tune in to enjoy Schnittke's Concerto for Violin and Orchestra performed by Yuri Bashmet with the Amsterdam Concert Orchestra.

Listen to it on Tuesday's Of Note with Katy Henriksen.

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Of Note with Katy Henriksen
10:00 am
Sat November 8, 2014

Sunday Symphony for November 9: The Mystery of Mahler

A work that has only recently garnered critical acclaim and performances from world class orchestras, Mahler's mysterious seventh symphony, informally titled Song of the Night, has come out of the shadows in a new release by the Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela under the direction of Gustavo Dudamel. 

Listen to it on KUAF's Sunday Symphony.

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Of Note with Katy Henriksen
3:22 pm
Fri November 7, 2014

Of Note for Friday, November 7: SoNA Season Opener

The Symphony of Northwest Arkansas kicks off its opening season this Saturday with works by Weber, Beethoven, and Copland. Join me as I sit down with music director Paul Haas and learn about this upcoming concert and more.  

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Of Note with Katy Henriksen
9:12 am
Tue November 4, 2014

Of Note for Tuesday, November 4: Early Music Rockstars

Blending centuries old tradition with a modern sensibility, the New York Times describes the early music ensemble Quicksilver as "rock stars within the early music scene." T

heir new release Fantasticus explores the free form composition technique known as stylus fantasticus, which came to prominence in the late 17th century and has remained, as 17th century scholar Athanasius Kircher wrote, "bound by nothing, neither words nor by harmonic subject."

Listen to it on Tuesday's Of Note with Katy Henriksen

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