David Wallace

Radio veteran David Wallace began his news and sports reporting career while in college in 1976. These days, it is more of a hobby than a main job. He anchors weekends and is on-call as a reporter-at-large for KUAR. Since moving to Little Rock in 1991, he has won 14 statewide first-place awards for radio journalism. His primary job now is with the state Department of Workforce Services at the Little Rock Workforce Center. He is single with a black lab named Hagan.

Former President Bill Clinton brought his co-author James Patterson through Little Rock Saturday on the latest leg of a book tour; one that has generated headlines for reasons unrelated to the book.

Clinton and Patterson, a best-selling thriller novelist, came to the UA Little Rock Jack Stephens Center to discuss their novel “The President Is Missing” in a panel moderated by actress and Arkansas native Mary Steenburgen.

Little Rock Mayor Mark Stodola is calling for city infrastructure improvements, while likely candidates to challenge his reelection bid this fall say changes should have been made long before now. Stodola delivered his annual State of the City Address Wednesday, which covered everything from the fire department’s new International Accreditation Designation, to new bikeways and outdoor sculptures. 

Little Rock city leaders addressed the spike in violent crime this year in the state's capital city at a forum Thursday night, even while acknowledging that talk is cheap.

"If we have nothing to show, meaning action, after we leave the meeting, we’ve wasted everyone’s time," Police Chief Kenton Buckner said during "Crime in Little Rock... a dialogue" presented by the Central Arkansas Library System at the Ron Robinson Auditorium.

"Our city has too many things going on for us to be meeting with nothing to show as a result of that meeting," Buckner said.

Officials with eStem Public Charter Schools, joined by Little Rock Mayor Mark Stodola, cut the ribbon Saturday to open their new high school location on the campus of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, perhaps the first charter school on the campus of a public university in the nation.

"The future is here; the future is today," said eStem CEO John Bacon in christening the new, approximately 33,000-square-foot building.

The Cleveland County town of Kingsland is pinning its hopes of parlaying the birth of Johnny Cash there 83 years ago into tourism gold on an upcoming festival and carnival.

A committee known as Kickstart Kingsland, an off-shoot of Kickstart Cleveland County,  will next meet Friday, Aug. 11, to plan the event, tentatively scheduled for September 16th.

"They're trying to work up a little fundraising festival," Kingsland Mayor Charles Crain said, "have live music, get some local groups, and (have) some vendors in."

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