Timothy Thompson, horn professor for the UA music department in Fayetteville, put together a chamber concert centered around his instrument. The result is only one piece from the 19th century, with the rest of the pieces dating to the 20th and 21st century. In addition to discussing his Sept. 9 recital, he explains why this is an especially exciting semester for horn lovers in the area.

Violinist Atticus Mulkey, a Rogers native, is about to head back to Baltimore for his final year at the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University. He stops by the Firmin-Garner Performance Studio to discuss his summer at this year's Aspen Music Festival, plays a little Bach and more.

The Fort Smith Symphony is the state's oldest, which turns 90 this year. John Jeter, music director, elaborates on all the exciting ways that the orchestra will be celebrating this very special season.

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NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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And so it's time to say goodbye. As you probably know, this, after 21 years, is the final broadcast of TALK OF THE NATION, and after 36 years, my last day at NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The final KUAF Fulbright Summer Chamber Music Festival concert June 20 will feature fast flute composed by Lowell Liebermann, Shotsakovich's Piano Trio in E minor, plus songs from Shostakovich and Amy Beach. Festival organizer Stephen Gates stopped in to discuss the season closer along with flutist Ronda Mains.

The KUAF Fulbright Chamber Music Festival continues this week with piano trios from Beethoven and Brahms, plus a tiny impromptu for flute and oboe by Thea Musgrave. Ensemble members Stephen Gates, cello, and Ronda Mains, flute, stop by to talk about this week's program and explain how chamber musicians stick together without the help of a conductor.

The KUAF Fulbright Chamber Music Festival continues Thursday with a sextet from Brahms and Schönberg's "Verklerte Nacht." Two members of the ensemble--Little Rock musicians David Gertstein, cello, and Geoffrey Robson, violin--stop by the studio to discuss the program.

The KUAF Fulbright Chamber Music Festival continues tonight with Debussy's lush string quartet and a divertimento for string trio from Mozart. Stephen Gates, festival organizer and cellist, and Er-Gene Kahng, violinist, stop by to discuss the night's repertoire and explore the divertimento form.

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