The UA music department's brass quintet Boston Mountain Brassworks has not just one, but two new members this season. Hear about the ensembles two new players from members Cory Mixdorf, trombone, and Timothy Thompson, horn, as well as why it's so much fun to play in a brass quintet - hint, they get to let it all out. Boston Mountain Brassworks perform in the Stella Boyle Smith Concert Hall on the UA campus in Fayetteville Friday, Nov. 8, at 7:30 p.m. It's a free concert open to the public. 

courtesy / Fort Smith Symphony

The 90th anniversary season of the Fort Smith Symphony continues with a performance with the Canadian Brass. Music Director John Jeter looks back on his very first season and ahead to the next in this conversation with Katy Henriksen.

Violinist Michelle Makarski collaborated with jazz giant Keith Jarrett in a new recording of Bach sonatas for violin and piano. When she spoke with Katy Henriksen she elaborated on her comparison to time-lapse photography for the endeavor.

The NYC-based Cassatt Quartet is pairing a brand new composition by Bruce Adolphe along with Shostakovich's introspective Eighth Quartet in a concert at the Great Hall of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art Friday, Oct. 4.

Bruce Adolphe, inventor of the piano puzzler for Performance Today says that if each puzzle was stacked back-to-back the result would be as long as Wagner's Ring Cycle. The popular weekly quiz based on a song reinvented in another composer's style has been around now for more than a decade. As Adolphe explains, it all started out as a teaching device. 

NYC-based composer Bruce Adolphe was commissioned by the University of Central Arkansas to write a new piece. When he found out the Cassatt Quartet would be debuting the composition, he decided to write about Impressionist painter Mary Cassatt. The piece "Mary Cassatt: Scenes From Her Life" will be presented by the Cassatt Quartet at the Great Hall of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art Friday, Oct. 4.

The Arkansas Philharmonic Orchestra kicks off its 2013-2014 season with a screening of Charlie Chaplin's City Lights accompanied by a live performance of the Chaplin score by the APO. Music Director Steven Byess elaborates on Chaplin as composer. 

Timothy Thompson, horn professor for the UA music department in Fayetteville, put together a chamber concert centered around his instrument. The result is only one piece from the 19th century, with the rest of the pieces dating to the 20th and 21st century. In addition to discussing his Sept. 9 recital, he explains why this is an especially exciting semester for horn lovers in the area.

Violinist Atticus Mulkey, a Rogers native, is about to head back to Baltimore for his final year at the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University. He stops by the Firmin-Garner Performance Studio to discuss his summer at this year's Aspen Music Festival, plays a little Bach and more.

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Updated at 12:22 a.m. ET

The federal government is now in a partial shutdown after Congress failed to pass a stopgap measure to keep funding going ahead of a midnight deadline.

It's an unprecedented situation given that shutdowns usually happen in times of divided government. But this is the first time it's happened with one party controlling both Congress and the White House.

The Senate is set to hold a vote before midnight on Friday on the bill the House passed last night to avert a government shutdown. If it passes, the government will remain funded for the next four weeks.

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The death of rocker Tom Petty in October 2017 came as a result of an accidental drug overdose with a toxic mix of drugs taken for several ailments, including a fractured hip.

The results of an autopsy were released Friday by Los Angeles County Medical Examiner-Coroner Jonathan Lucas.

Petty died at 66 of "multisystem organ failure due to resuscitated cardiopulmonary arrest due to mixed drug toxicity," according to a brief statement.

The drugs listed included "fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetylfentanyl, and despropionyl fentanyl."

In 1971, Winnette Willis was a 23-year-old single mom in Chicago when she became pregnant again. "I was terrified of having another child," she tells Radio Diaries.

Before the Supreme Court's decision in Roe v. Wade 45 years ago, abortion was illegal in most of the United States, including in Illinois.

Women like Willis who wanted to terminate their pregnancies had limited and often frightening options. She wasn't sure what to do. And then one day, while she was waiting on an L train platform, she saw a sign.

Facebook is rolling out a major change to its News Feed: pushing up news articles that come from "high quality" sources, and pushing down the others. The move signals that, in an effort to combat the problem of fake news, the social media giant is willing to play a kind of editorial role — making decisions based on substance, not just how viral a headline may be.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a post to his Facebook page:

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