Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And so it's time to say goodbye. As you probably know, this, after 21 years, is the final broadcast of TALK OF THE NATION, and after 36 years, my last day at NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

The final KUAF Fulbright Summer Chamber Music Festival concert June 20 will feature fast flute composed by Lowell Liebermann, Shotsakovich's Piano Trio in E minor, plus songs from Shostakovich and Amy Beach. Festival organizer Stephen Gates stopped in to discuss the season closer along with flutist Ronda Mains.

The KUAF Fulbright Chamber Music Festival continues this week with piano trios from Beethoven and Brahms, plus a tiny impromptu for flute and oboe by Thea Musgrave. Ensemble members Stephen Gates, cello, and Ronda Mains, flute, stop by to talk about this week's program and explain how chamber musicians stick together without the help of a conductor.

The KUAF Fulbright Chamber Music Festival continues Thursday with a sextet from Brahms and Schönberg's "Verklerte Nacht." Two members of the ensemble--Little Rock musicians David Gertstein, cello, and Geoffrey Robson, violin--stop by the studio to discuss the program.

The KUAF Fulbright Chamber Music Festival continues tonight with Debussy's lush string quartet and a divertimento for string trio from Mozart. Stephen Gates, festival organizer and cellist, and Er-Gene Kahng, violinist, stop by to discuss the night's repertoire and explore the divertimento form.

The second KUAF Fulbright Summer Chamber Music Festival concert of the season features the viola, which Stephen Gates describes as the heavy cream of stringed instruments. Gates, cellist and festival organizer discusses the Mozart quintet the ensemble will perform tomorrow night, as well as all things viola.

Symphony of Northwest Arkansas concludes its second season with a John Williams Tribute concert this weekend. Music Director Paul Haas stops by to explain why Williams is "the Wagner for the modern era" and what's to come next season.

Many folks might not know that Samuel Barber's famed Adagio for Strings was taken from his String Quartet, op. 11. That work, plus Dvorak's "American" quartet and Ginastera's "Impresiones de la Puna" are on the program to kick of the first concert of the KUAF Fulbright Summer Chamber Music Festival. Stephen Gates, festival organizer and cellist, stops by to discuss the program, which takes place 7 p.m. Friday, May 17, at the Great Hall in Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. 

Pages

Win front row tickets to see David Sedaris

at Walton Arts Center on Tuesday, October 24th 2017

World and Area News

Elected officials in Jonesboro will NOT receive a pay raise at this time.

The Jonesboro City Council amended an ordinance last night that called for six-percent pay raises for elected officials in Jonesboro.  The original ordinance called for all elected officials to receive a raise, but alderman made the change that took the city council out of consideration.  They then voted on whether or not Jonesboro Mayor Harold Perrin, City Attorney Carol Duncan, and City Clerk Donna Jackson would receive a six percent raise.  That was voted down 10 to one. 

Patients awaiting Arkansas's first-in-the-Bible-Belt medical marijuana program will have to demonstrate that other kind of patience.

The agency administering the program has announced that no licenses will be granted this year or perhaps even early next year.

The application period closed Sept. 18 with a surprise, says the Department of Finance and Administration’s Scott Hardin.

A National Transportation Safety Board report on the 2016 hot air balloon crash that killed all 16 people aboard finds that the pilot's "pattern of poor decision-making" was to blame. But the safety board also reserves some culpability for an FAA policy that exempts commercial balloon operators from needing medical certification.

When negotiators for the United States, Canada and Mexico wrapped up the latest round of trade talks in Washington on Tuesday, they sounded frustrated — and far apart.

From cars to cows, they have big disagreements over how the North American Free Trade Agreement should work. In fact, the disputes appear so big, they may be threatening the future of NAFTA.

So officials have agreed to delay their next meeting — pushing off its start in Mexico City until Nov. 17; they originally had planned to meet later this month.

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

The pushback — and the outrage — began immediately.

Trump was asked on Monday why he had not yet commented on the deaths of four U.S. soldiers who were ambushed during a mission in Niger on Oct. 4. In his answer, Trump turned attention to the policies of past presidents and their contact with families of service members who have died.

On Tuesday, he followed his initial comments with more assertions, offering a specific example. That prompted further rebuttal from staff of previous administrations.

More News