Rogers native Atticus Mulkey, a violinist studying at the Peabody Institute at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, is in Northwest Arkansas to raise money to get to the Aspen Music Festival. He speaks to Katy Henriksen about why classical music is important and how he plans to raise the funds to get to Aspen.

German pianist and composer Ratko Delorko was a visiting professor at the University of Arkansas's music department this past winter. Delorko stopped by the Firmin-Garner Performance Studio for a performance of both classical and original compositions.

The Symphony of Northwest Arkansas performs Mahler's Adagietto from his 5th symphony and Beethoven's 9th for its April concert. Director Paul Haas discusses the program with host Katy Henriksen.

Katy Henriksen discusses the Symphony of Northwest Arkansas's final concert of the season with Music Director Paul Haas.

Katy Henriksen speaks with Christopher Lacy of the John Harrison Opera Foundation and pianist Donald Sulzen, Antonacci's accompanist, about a rare stateside performance from Italian diva Anna Katerina Antonacci.

Conductor Steven Byess of the Arkansas Philharmonic Orchestra visits the KUAF studio with composer Sara Carina Graef to discuss the APO's All-American February concert.

Archive: Star Shopper

Oct 31, 2011

With the popularity of the internet, tablets, and e-readers, print media has seen a recent decline in circulation and advertising revenue. However, Star Shopper that provides its weekly publication for free to readers, earning income solely from advertising revenue, has actually seen consistent growth.

Rachmaninoff

Jan 12, 2007

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Copland

Jan 12, 2007

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World and Area News

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Hurricane Irma slammed through the Turks and Caicos Islands en route to a destructive encounter with Florida this weekend. Although the storm has been downgraded slightly, it remains a massively powerful system, forecasters say.

The extent of the damage to the low-lying island chain, located just east of the Bahamas, was not immediately known, but winds at the top end of the hurricane scale and waves as high as 20 feet had been forecast.

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Jonathan Guffey has chiseled youthful looks and, at 32, does not have the haggard bearing of someone who's spent more than half his life hooked on opioids. That stint with the drug started at 15 and ended — he says for good — 22 months ago. He has a job working with his family in construction, but his work history is pockmarked by addiction.

"I've worked in a couple of factories for a short amount of time, probably just long enough to get the first check to get high off of," Guffey says.

Hurricane Irma is hovering somewhere between being the most- and second-most powerful hurricane recorded in the Atlantic. It follows Harvey, which dumped trillions of gallons of water on South Texas. And now, Hurricane Jose is falling into step behind Irma, and gathering strength.

Is this what climate change scientists predicted?

In a word, yes. Climate scientists like Michael Mann at Penn State says, "The science is now fairly clear that climate change will make stronger storms stronger." Or wetter.

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